Meaning of NEW in English

NEW

/ njuː; NAmE nuː/ adjective

( newer , new·est )

NOT EXISTING BEFORE

1.

not existing before; recently made, invented, introduced, etc. :

Have you read her new novel?

new ways of doing things

This idea isn't new.

The latest model has over 100 new features.

—see also brand-new

OPP old

2.

the new noun [ U ] something that is new :

It was a good mix of the old and the new.

RECENTLY BOUGHT

3.

recently bought :

Let me show you my new dress.

NOT USED BEFORE

4.

not used or owned by anyone before :

A second-hand car costs a fraction of a new one.

DIFFERENT

5.

different from the previous one :

I like your new hairstyle.

When do you start your new job?

He's made a lot of new friends.

OPP old

NOT FAMILIAR

6.

new (to sb) already existing but not seen, experienced, etc. before; not familiar :

This is a new experience for me.

I'd like to learn a new language.

Our system is probably new to you.

the discovery of a new star

RECENTLY ARRIVED

7.

new (to sth) not yet familiar with sth because you have only just started, arrived, etc. :

I should tell you, I'm completely new to this kind of work.

I am new to the town.

a new arrival / recruit

You're new here, aren't you?

NEW-

8.

used in compounds to describe sth that has recently happened :

He was enjoying his new-found freedom.

MODERN

9.

(usually with the ) modern; of the latest type :

the new morality

They called themselves the New Romantics.

JUST BEGINNING

10.

[ usually before noun ] just beginning or beginning again :

a new day

It was a new era in the history of our country.

She went to Australia to start a new life.

WITH FRESH ENERGY

11.

having fresh energy, courage or health :

Since he changed jobs he's looked like a new man.

RECENTLY PRODUCED

12.

only recently produced or developed :

The new buds are appearing on the trees now.

new potatoes (= ones dug from the soil early in the season)

►  new·ness noun [ U ]

—see also newly

IDIOMS

- break new ground

- (as) good as new | like new

- ... is the new ...

- a new broom

- a / the new kid on the block

- a new one on me

- turn over a new leaf

- what's new?

—more at blood , brave adjective , breathe , complexion , teach

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English nīwe , nēowe , of Germanic origin; related to Dutch nieuw and German neu , from an Indo-European root shared by Sanskrit nava , Latin novus , and Greek neos new.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.