Meaning of SAFE in English

SAFE

/ seɪf; NAmE / adjective , noun

■ adjective

( safer , saf·est )

PROTECTED

1.

[ not before noun ] safe (from sb/sth) protected from any danger or harm :

The children are quite safe here.

She didn't feel safe on her own.

Will the car be safe parked in the road?

They aimed to make the country safe from terrorist attacks.

Your secret is safe with me (= I will not tell anyone else) .

Here's your passport. Now keep it safe .

OPP unsafe

WITHOUT PHYSICAL DANGER

2.

safe (to do sth) | safe (for sb) not likely to lead to any physical harm or danger :

Is the water here safe to drink?

The street is not safe for children to play in.

It is one of the safest cars in the world.

We watched the explosion from a safe distance .

Builders were called in to make the building safe .

OPP unsafe

NOT HARMED / LOST

3.

not harmed, damaged, lost, etc. :

We were glad she let us know she was safe.

The missing child was found safe and well .

They turned up safe and sound .

A reward was offered for the animal's safe return .

PLACE

4.

where sb/sth is not likely to be in danger or to be lost :

We all want to live in safer cities.

Keep your passport in a safe place.

OPP unsafe

WITHOUT RISK

5.

safe (to do sth) not involving much or any risk; not likely to be wrong or to upset sb :

a safe investment

a safe subject for discussion

It's safe to assume (that) there will always be a demand for new software.

It would be safer to take more money with you in case of emergency.

( disapproving )

The show was well performed, but so safe and predictable.

PERSON

6.

[ usually before noun ] doing an activity in a careful way

SYN careful :

a safe driver

LAW

7.

based on good evidence :

a safe verdict

OPP unsafe

—see also fail-safe

IDIOMS

- better safe than sorry

- in safe hands | in the safe hands of sb

- on the safe side

- play (it) safe

- (as) safe as houses

- safe in the knowledge that

- a safe pair of hands

—more at bet noun

■ noun

a strong metal box or cupboard with a complicated lock, used for storing valuable things in, for example, money or jewellery

••

WORD ORIGIN

Middle English (as an adjective): from Old French sauf , from Latin salvus uninjured. The noun is from the verb save , later assimilated to the adjectival form.

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.