Meaning of FIRE in English

FIRE

/ ˈfaɪə(r); NAmE / noun , verb

■ noun

STH BURNING

1.

[ U ] the flames, light and heat, and often smoke, that are produced when sth burns :

Most animals are afraid of fire.

2.

[ U , C ] flames that are out of control and destroy buildings, trees, etc. :

The car was now on fire .

The warehouse has been badly damaged by fire.

Several youths had set fire to the police car (= had made it start burning) .

A candle had set the curtains on fire .

These thatched roofs frequently catch fire (= start to burn) .

forest fires

Five people died in a house fire last night.

A small fire had started in the kitchen.

Fires were breaking out everywhere.

It took two hours to put out the fire (= stop it burning) .

FOR HEATING / COOKING

3.

[ C ] a pile of burning fuel, such as wood or coal, used for cooking food or heating a room :

to make / build a fire

a log / coal fire

Sam had lit a fire to welcome us home.

Come and get warm by the fire.

We sat in front of a roaring fire .

—see also bonfire , campfire

4.

[ C ] ( especially BrE ) a piece of equipment for heating a room :

a gas / electric fire

Shall I put the fire on?

—see also heater

FROM GUNS

5.

[ U ] shots from guns :

a burst of machine-gun fire

to return fire (= to fire back at sb who is shooting at you)

The gunmen opened fire on (= started shooting at) the police.

Their vehicle came under fire (= was being shot at) .

He ordered his men to hold their fire (= not to shoot) .

A young girl was in the line of fire (= between the person shooting and what he / she was shooting at) .

ANGER / ENTHUSIASM

6.

[ U ] very strong emotion, especially anger or enthusiasm :

Her eyes were full of fire.

IDIOMS

- be / come under fire

- hang / hold fire

- on fire

- play with fire

—more at ball noun , baptism , draw verb , fight verb , frying pan , house noun , iron noun , smoke noun , world

■ verb

SHOOT

1.

fire (sth) (at sb/sth) | fire (sth) (into sth) | fire (on sb/sth) to shoot bullets from a gun :

[ v ]

The officer ordered his men to fire.

Soldiers fired on the crowd.

[ vn ]

He fired the gun into the air.

They ran away as soon as the first shot was fired.

Missiles were fired at the enemy.

2.

( of a gun ) to shoot bullets out :

[ v ]

We heard the sound of guns firing.

[ vn ]

A starter's pistol fires only blanks.

3.

[ vn ] to shoot an arrow :

She fired an arrow at the target.

FROM JOB

4.

[ vn ] to force sb to leave their job

SYN sack :

We had to fire him for dishonesty.

She got fired from her first job.

He was responsible for hiring and firing staff.

MAKE SB ENTHUSIASTIC

5.

[ vn ] fire sb (with sth) to make sb feel very excited about sth or interested in sth :

The talk had fired her with enthusiasm for the project.

His imagination had been fired by the film.

OF ENGINE

6.

[ v ] when an engine fires , an electrical spark is produced that makes the fuel burn and the engine start to work

-FIRED

7.

(in adjectives) using the fuel mentioned in order to operate :

gas-fired central heating

CLAY OBJECTS

8.

[ vn ] to heat a clay object to make it hard and strong :

to fire pottery

to fire bricks in a kiln

IDIOMS

- fire questions, insults, etc. at sb

—more at cylinder

PHRASAL VERBS

- fire away

- fire sth off

- fire sb up

- fire sth up

••

WORD ORIGIN

Old English fӯr (noun), fӯrian supply with material for a fire , of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch vuur and German Feuer .

Oxford Advanced Learner's English Dictionary.      Оксфордский английский словарь для изучающик язык на продвинутом уровне.